Two chipping techniques everyone should learn | By Danny Jakubowski (Abu Dhabi Golf Club)

The next time you find yourself on the practice chipping green, try experimenting with the ‘Hinge and Hold’ and the ‘Linear or U shaped method’. It will add versatility to your short game toolbox and save valuable strokes on your scorecard.

BUT FIRST AN ANATOMY LESSON…

The leading edge (or dig) –  is the front part of the club and has a tendency to dig.

The trailing edge – the difference in the angle between the trailing edge and the leading edge is the bounce. Bounce helps the club glide through sand and grass.

Sole – the yellow area represents the sole of the club. Different grinds and designs of soles allow for different shot making.

SHOT 1:
THE HINGE AND HOLD:

The hinge and hold method has a tendency to:

  1. Promote the leading edge as the main point of turf contact.
  2. De-loft the club.
  3. Add a steeper angle of attack into the ball.
  4. Increase spin.

You can see from the pictures there is slightly more wrist hinge going back, and a retention of that hinge or “hold” on the follow through. The hands stay firm and lead the follow through.

This is ideal for:

  • Hardpan or firm ground.
  • Lower, high spin shots around the green.
  • Deep rough.

Less than ideal for:

  • Chipping into the grain.
  • Muddy areas.
  • Lofted shots.

SHOT 2:
LINEAR OR U SHAPED METHOD:

  1. The linear or U shaped method has a tendency to:
  2. Promote the bounce of the club so that the sole is brushing the grass rather digging.
  3. Maximise the loft of the club.
  4. Promote a shallower, less aggressive angle of attack to the ball.

You can see from the photos that there is a wider arm swing with less wrist hinge and the follow through is promoting a release whereby the club is allowed to pass the hands.

This is ideal for:

Grainy lies where the club should not be digging into the turf.

Soft and spongy grass.

Higher lofted and softer spinning shots.

Less than ideal for:

  • Hardpan lies and firm ground.
  • Lower shots that require more spin.
  • Long grass.

The next time you find yourself on the practice chipping green, try experimenting with the ‘Hinge and Hold’ and the ‘Linear or U shaped method’. It will add versatility to your short game toolbox and save valuable strokes on your scorecard. 

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